Prize Winners

 

SHEAR Book Prize 2015

The 2015 SHEAR Book Prize went to Shane White, in recognition of his book entitled Prince of Darkness: The Untold Story of Jeremiah G. Hamilton, Wall Street’s First Black Millionaire (St. Martin’s Press, 2015). Shane White is the Challis Professor of History and an Australian Professorial Fellow in the History Department at the University of Sydney specializing in African-American history.

The 2015 James Broussard Best First Book Prize went to April R. Haynes, in recognition of her book entitled Riotous Flesh: Women, Physiology, and the Solitary Vice in Nineteenth-Century America (The University of Chicago Press, 2015). April R. Haynes is an assistant professor of history at University of Wisconsin-Madison.

The 2015 James Broussard Best First Book Prize went to Brian Phillips Murphy, in recognition of his book entitled Building the Empire State: Political Economy in the Early Republic (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2015). Brian Murphy is an assistant professor of history at Baruch College.

The 2015 James Bradford Biography Prize went to Mary Sarah Bilder, in recognition of her book entitled Madison’s Hand: Revising the Constitutional Convention (Harvard University Press, 2015). Mary Sarah Bilder is Founders Professor of Law and Michael and Helen Lee Distinguished Scholar, Boston College Law School.

The 2015 inaugural Mary Kelley Prize went to Jen Manion, in recognition of her book entitled Liberty’s Prisoners: Carceral Culture in Early America (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2015). Jen Manion is an associate professor of history at Amherst College.

Article Prize 2015:

The 2015 Ralph D. Gray Article Prize went to Rebeccah Bechtold in recognition of her 2015 Journal of the Early Republic article entitled “A Revolutionary Soundscape: Musical Reform and the Science of Sound in Early America, 1760-1840.” Rebeccah Bechtold is an assistant professor of English at the Wichita State University.

SHEAR Manuscript Prize 2015

The SHEAR Manuscript Prize went to Donald F. Johnson in recognition of his 2015 Northwestern dissertation entitled “Occupied America: Everyday Experience and the Failure of Imperial Authority in Revolutionary Cities under British Rule, 1775-1783.” Donald F. Johnson is an assistant professor of history at North Dakota State University.